Monday, November 22, 2010

Consumerism, Academic Standards, and Civility

http://diverseeducation.com/cache/print.php?articleId=13873

4 comments:

  1. None of these problems sound like news, though it's possible that they are becoming more prevalent. Infighting among colleagues and clueless entitlement of some students probably go back to when Speusippus ran the Academy. The article offers no compelling evidence that things are worse today, and most of those quoted in it weasel about that -- "we're talking about this more." The consumerist fallacy, the bizarre belief that one is entitled to grades one hasn't earned as a result of paying tuition, dates at least to the Reagan administration, and it's roots may go back centuries.

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  2. I think many students are propelled in their belief that they can ask for extras because many teachers give them freely in order to be on the student's good side. Although students should learn to keep whining in check (it annoys other students, who actually work hard, as well), it is a matter of conditioning: they do what they get rewarded for.

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  3. Matt: Funny how so many of the US's current ills date back to the Ronnie Raygun administration.

    Nicole: no doubt that's true. In an ideal academic setting, teachers would get on the good side of students by demanding that they invest themselves fully in their studies. Teachers who submit to whining students would be laughed out of the academy.

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  4. Hmmm… I suppose I’m out the 49$ I paid for an online P.h.D.

    Nicole is right; some students might fulfill all the necessary requirements as a ‘matter of conditioning’, absent an emphasis on content. Students might better develop character traits that are conducive to actual learning and experience if 'they invest themselves fully in their studies'. To see (understand, examine)things in a new light, in my view, is to experience education – to do philosophy.

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