Wednesday, April 21, 2010

(CR) Resources for Understanding RC

1. Visit and explore the official Radical Constructivism page.

2. Here's a 2 minute video of Ernst von Glasersfeld on "wanting to be right."

I wonder if he thinks he is right to suggest that we care too much about being right? Is it wrong to care about being right? Is that his view? If it is, does he not believe this particular belief of his is right? Why, then, does he believe it? Is it wrong for me to want to be right about his view of what's right? Maybe he simply means to reject "rightness" in favor of viability. Is that right? Or is that rightly thought of as yet another wrong use of right? My head spins.

8 comments:

  1. if you seek to be right, it is impossible to learn anything because your focus is on expressing and defending your current position based on past experiences without accounting for fallibility of past experience and openness to new information. however, if you seek truth, the availability of being right comes into existence if your current position is consistent with all other information. truth is the only goal worth pursuing (it is only the loser of a debate that gains anything- epicurus)
    i do not think that von glasersfeld could ever be right except perhaps about his own experience, because in order to be right your observation must be consistent with the reality that exists beyond our perception of it. the difference between being right and being correct is the access to knowledge through the external world. if you ask me for directions and i do not know but tell you to take a right a left and another right and you find the place, i was correct, but if you ask me and i were to know how to get to your destination i would be right.

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  2. Right; seeking truth is the (right) route to rightness.

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  3. It would be worth distinguishing, perhaps, the psychological/interpersonal problem of the desire to be top dog, the person who is in command of the truth, on the one hand, from what Aristotle calls the natural human inclination to be engaged in knowing on the other hand.

    Von G. is surely right(!) that the former can distract and interfere with clear thinking, and is a bullying impulse we ought to curb. Maturana says truth claims are demands for obedience, and sometimes they are. This is mainly about egocentrism, status, control of others, etc.

    Wanting to be right in the latter sense, however, is another matter, and it is far from clear that von G. or anyone else has any business making propositional statements if he does not hope -- and present himself as attempting -- to be right about what they say.

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  4. My view exactly. At its worst, it's simply a tolerant-sounding way to deflect or dodge criticism.

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  5. Sorry to disturb this philosophical conversation, but the "wanting to be right" link just leads you to the radical constructivism page. Where is the movie exactly? I looked under the tabs that it would likly be under and I searched it, but I couldn't find it.

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  6. I think he absolutely is right in saying that we care too much about being right. It really is the moment when we realize that we do not have to be right, when we begin to enjoy things more. Because you are not focusing on being the one who is correct, you can just enjoy things without being in an argument about why you enjoy them. But! if we all realized that, then wee would not have these profound philosophical discussions, so this way of thinking is really good for some indiiduals. But only a few at a time!

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  7. How much does he care about being right about caring too much about being right?

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